"You can’t get away from yourself by moving from one place to another."
— Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (via u-can-quote-me-on-that)
76
Yossarian

literarystarbucks:

Yossarian goes up to the counter to order a latte. He pulls out $3.00 to pay for it, but the barista informs him the price has recently gone up to $3.50. Yossarian has to run home to get fifty more cents, walking along a street full of murderers, rapists, child molesters; fires burning in every window, the acrid smell of smoke burning his nostrils. By the time he gets back, the price of a latte has been raised to $4.00.

245
literaryglamour:

When reading Faulkner…
102
itwasthebestoflines:

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1922).
12
436
2853
"Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me,
Knowing thy heart torments me with disdain,
Have put on black and loving mourners be,
Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain.
And truly not the morning sun of heaven
Better becomes the grey cheeks of the east,
Nor that full star that ushers in the even,
Doth half that glory to the sober west,
As those two mourning eyes become thy face:
O, let it then as well beseem thy heart
To mourn for me, since mourning doth thee grace,
And suit thy pity like in every part.
Then will I swear beauty herself is black
And all they foul that thy complexion lack."
— Sonnet 132, William Shakespeare (via dailyshakespeare)
110
thenewrepublic:

Walt Whitman and Oscar Wilde once spent an afternoon together. Here’s what took place at that historic meeting. 
125
5
booksandtheirstories:

The Book Depository Mail
733
"All moments, past, present and future, always have existed, always will exist."
— Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (via wordsnquotes)
963
"The artist is the brother of the felon and the madman."
— Thomas Mann, Doctor Faustus (via talesofpassingtime)
61
prettybooks:

Frankenstein (by Stefani)
357
nevver:

Art is just another form of screaming
26751
drunk-on-books:

"Zola’s masterpiece of working life, Germinal (1885), exposes the inhuman conditions of miners in northern France in the 1860s. By Zola’s death in 1902 it had come to symbolize the call for freedom from oppression so forcefully that the crowd which gathered at his State funeral chanted ‘Germinal! Germinal!’. The central figure, Etienne Lantier, is an outsider who enters the community and eventually leads his fellow-miners in a strike protesting against pay-cuts - a strike which becomes a losing battle against starvation, repression, and sabotage. Yet despite the violence and disillusion which rock the mining community to its foundations, Lantier retains his belief in the ultimate germination of a new society, leading to a better world. "
12


/ 1 2 3 4 5 / +